David Avidan (1934-1995)

When my soul skyrockets to the heavens
an unending rustle of paper will accompany me.
And perhaps if I’m lucky, the crackle of microfilm.

This quotation appears in the Poetry International article on David Avidan, taken from “Fast and Plenty” (cannot find full citation). Poetry International also includes Avidan in an article about “Nano-Poetics.”

Avidan is famous for inventing words, a prominent theme in analysis of the 2017 Futureman:

This translation by Tsipi Keller, who brought great passion to the project, which is called “Futureman” — “very simply, I love him,” she told me — admirably preserves Avidan’s made-up words, such as his famous description of himself as an adamila, or “wordman.” The translation is accompanied by an extensive and helpful introduction by scholar Anat Weisman, which explains Avidan’s place in the history of Hebrew poetry, and shows the effect his radicalism had on other Israeli writers.
— Aviya Kushner (The Grammar of God), “How David Avidan Became Hebrew’s Most Experimental Poet” in The Forward

Futureman. David Avidan. Tsipi Keller, trans. LA: Phoneme Media, 2017 (Goodreads link; Phoneme link)

cover from Phoneme Media

Avidan’s wiki — there is also a page in Hebrew — and ITHL pages.

See also the 2018 podcast, “The Poet Who Longed for the Future.”

Avidan’s work appears in the newer (2003) bilingual edition of The Hebrew Poem Itself, as well as in several English translation collections. See Hebrew Poetry in Translation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s