Gathering Sources: Bechukotai

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion Bechukotai — occasionally spelled “Bechukosai,” or “B’hukkothai” — Levitucus 26:3-27:34. This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book”:

A Path to Follow: Clearing Out the Old
Something to Notice: Women, Vayikra, and Progress
Great Source(s): Anonymous Commandments to God (9-11th Century CE)

See also on the Haftarah: “Notes on Jeremiah: Max Ticktin’s Scribbles”

Next read in most of the Diaspora on May 25, 2019;
Bechukotai is read in double-portion with Behar in non-leap years.

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Gathering Sources: Behar

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion Behar, Leviticus 25:1-26:2, sometimes spelled “B’har or “Be-Har.” This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book.”

A Path to Follow

Also from Behar: Jubilee and “Free at Last”?

Toward Harvest, part 1

Fewer resources for Behar, which is often read in double-portion with Bechukotai; few more next week.

Some Say 400 Cubits: Slow Dancing with Talmud

I first learned the story of “The Oven of Akhnai” (B. Baba Metzia 59a-59b) in the context of Imma Shalom, wife of Rabbi Eliezer, and her teaching about “the gate of wounded feelings.” I learned more about Rabbi Eliezer’s life, post-Akhnai, from a class on one of the Nine Talmudic Readings of Emmanuel Levinas. In addition, I’ve seen and heard the text referenced in many a commentary emphasizing that “Torah is not in heaven.” (See notes below on Akhnai, Imma Shalom, and Levinas.) For the first time, however, I am now reading the story in a small community of learners grappling directly with the text as it appears in the Babylonian Talmud…

…word by word,
sometimes syllable by syllable,
through Aramaic and Hebrew,
without relying on previous translation,
until we’ve discerned, at least tentatively,
each word’s root and tense,
gender, number, and possible meanings.
We learn how the words work with one another,
how “technical” expressions like “it is taught,” add clues,
how we, together with our study partners,
and then as a group with our teacher,
can work together to explore
what the text might be saying
and what that says about Jewish thought….

For this “Contemplative Bet Midrash,” taught by SVARA Fellow Rabbi Lauren Tuchman, we are asked to set aside any previous meetings and encounter the text as though for the first time. (For more on SVARA: The Traditionally Radical Yeshiva, visit their website.)

We are encouraged to look up every word, even ones we (think we) know, in order to consider a variety of possible definitions.

SVARA-Inspired Slow Dance

The opening line of our text, for example, tells us “they cut it into pieces,” without explaining who cut what or why. So, we test out “circle” and “dance” and “everyday” before settling on “sand” as the best definition for “חול (chol),” the substance between these unexplained pieces.

We learn that these pieces and sand are “the oven of Akhnai,” and then ask, right along with the voice of the Gemara: “What is this, Akhnai?”

We experience as passing strange the introduction of a carob tree as a point of proof in this argument. Our studies paused this past week right after “they” tell Rabbi Eliezer, “we don’t take evidence from carob trees.” And from this cliff-hanging perspective, I notice things I previously missed.

I’ve never noticed before how this story begins with an image of brokenness — “they cut it into pieces” — and then introduces Rabbi Eliezer already in opposition to the Hakhamim (“Wise Ones,” that is, scholars holding the majority opinion in this case). Previous passes through this material made clear there was a dispute of some magnitude, but I never noticed the extremes of response here, even before we reach the carob tree and what follows:

  • Rabbi Eliezer does not just argue but brings “all the responses (or refutations or arguments) in the world [כל תשובות שבעולם (khol teshuvot sh’ba-olam)],” while
  • the Hakhamim refuse to accept (any) arguments from him, [ולא קיבלו הימנו (v’lo kivalu heimenu)],” rather than simply disagreeing.

“They refused to accept (anything) from him.”

When our learning for one week paused at this point, that phrase just seemed so stark. (Despite attempts to meet the text anew, I’m sure my reaction is influenced to some extent by previous encounters. Still.)

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You are There

Along with feeling the starkness of Rabbi Eliezer’s rejection, I understood the frustration of a community that had made a decision and still heard “all the refutations in the world” from one individual. After all, I’ve been there often enough: watching participants in a community meeting come to a difficult decision while one person — for better or worse in the long run — just cannot get on board….

…Some readers might remember when Walter Cronkite (1916-2009) did those “You Are There” reports, like this one when he speaks from the midst of the Chicago Fire on October 18, 1871. There is a big difference between such a “report,” however contrived, and more distant approaches to history….

One of the effects of the SVARA-inspired slow pace through the material, I’m realizing, is a little like those Cronkite reports: I am there in a way I had not been before.

Learning unfamiliar jargon — or “technical terms” — of the Talmud, as SVARA-inspired spaces encourage, also promotes the “you are there” experience. Some other Talmud studies have included such terms, but I’ve never before been in a group where the practice is to stick with one bit of text until we all have the basics of how it arrived. I now know, for example, that “we learned there” [t’nan hatam] doesn’t reference something taught elsewhere in Babylon or in Jerusalem: instead, it means “elsewhere in the text” (and I am now able to locate the citations on the page). Rabbi Tuchman teaches us to recognize shifts from Mishnah to Gemara and back and make sure we know who is speaking to whom and when. Being asked to constantly orient ourselves within the text makes for a different experience of it.

When the carob tree gets up and moves 100 cubits for Rabbi Eliezer’s proof, the rabbinical report includes the expression, “but some tell it” [v’amri lah], and the alternative recollection: “400 cubits.” In the past, I’ve read this, without giving it much weight, as two variants of a fantastic tale. But, in this word-by-word, step-by-step shuffle with the text I hear two sets of witnesses telling me that they were there. Now, so am I.

Another Cliff-Hanger

Rabbi Lauren Tuchman’s Contemplative Bet Midrash left us all, at the end of our last session, in the midst of a dispute about cooking that has spiraled into strange realms. A group of Hakhamim have made their decision, while Rabbi Eliezer, so convinced of his own point of view, moves from verbal arguments to calling on supernatural “proof.” Witnesses saw the carob tree move 100 cubits, though some say it was 400 cubits. But the Hakhamim don’t accept that as “evidence” in this oven dispute.

Where will the frustration, anger, pride, arguments and magic lead? How will community kashrut standards be effected? What will be the result of those decisions in terms of holiness? What will be the effect on the community?

I confess to an inclination to read ahead or binge watch to the conclusion. But one of the things this slow dance teaches is that any such conclusion would be meaningless. The real goal is not to “finish” the story, maybe choosing to be #TeamEliezer or #TeamHakhamim along the way. The goal — at least as I understand things this week — is to consider the story together with others, sharing insights and concerns, and to experience together real fears for how this will all turn out for the individuals and the community involved. And that includes us.

It’s uncomfortable, even a little scary, up here on this cliff. But we won’t get down on our own.




NOTES on the Oven of Akhnai, Imma Shalom, and Women in the Talmud NOTES:

  • Akhnai
  • Imma Shalom
  • Levinas and The Akhnai Story
    • Levinas, Emmanuel. Nine Talmudic Readings. Annette Aronowicz, trans. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1990. Lectures 1963-1975 in French
    • Rabbi Goldie Milgram, Reclaiming Judaism, offered a series of classes on the Levinas chapters at National Havurah Committee Summer Institute
    • The chapter, “Desacralization and Disenchantment,” looks at Sanhedrin 67a-68a, which describes the end of Rabbi Eliezer’s life. (It was this chapter I had the opportunity to explore in a long-ago week-long class at the Institute.)

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Gathering Sources: Emor

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion, Emor (Leviticus 21:1-24:23; no common alternative spellings). This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book.”

Something to Notice: damage to God and God’s name
Language and Translation: Complete Rest (Lev 23:32)
Great Source(s): on the Omer
A Path to Follow: Four times Moses asked God to decide

Due to differences in holiday observances, Torah reading schedules begin to diverge in some congregations with the holiday of Passover. Emor is next read on May 11, beginning with minchah on May 4, in Israel and Reform calendars; it is next read in orthodox, Conservative, and many other congregations on May 18, beginning with minchah on May 11.

Gathering Sources: Kedoshim

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion, Kedoshim (Leviticus 19:1-20:27; occasionally spelled “K’doshim” or starting with “Q”). This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book.”

Due to differences in holiday observances, Torah reading schedules begin to diverge in some congregations with the holiday of Passover. Kedoshim is next read on May 4, beginning with minchah on April 27, in Israel and Reform calendars; it is next read in orthodox, Conservative, and many other congregations on May 11, beginning with minchah on May 4.

Something to Notice: “female” attention to minutia
Language and Translation: Lev 19:4 (don’t turn/no gods)
Great Source(s): Holiness Ripple
A Path to Follow: An Old Question
based on the still relevant, if somewhat dated, “Study Mehitza

See also: Stumbling Blocks Before Us All

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Gathering Sources: Acharei Mot

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion, Acharei Mot (Leviticus 16:1-18:30; also sometimes: Aharei Mot or Aharei Mos). This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book.”

Due to differences in holiday observances, Torah reading schedules begin to diverge between Movements with the holiday of Passover. Acharei Mot is next read on April 27, beginning with minchah on April 20, in Israel and Reform calendars; it is next read in orthodox, Conservative, and many other congregations on May 4, beginning with minchah on April 27.

Something to Notice: “Go Tell Your Brother”
A Path to Follow: Charles Reznikoff and four pens in five fingers
Language and Translation: Nefesh and ish sound patterns
Great Source(s): No Creature Unfit

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Gathering Sources: Metzora

Some thoughts and resources for exploring the Torah portion, “Metzora,” Leviticus 14:1-15:33. Also spelled: M’tzora or M’tsora, sometimes Metsora or Mezora. This is part of a series of weekly “gathering sources” posts, collecting previous material on the weekly Torah portion, most originally part of a 2010 series called “Opening the Book.”

Metzora is next read beginning at minchah on Shabbat 4/6/19 (Shabbat Tazria). NOTE: Although most there are usually four posts for a portion, this series was written in a year when Tazria and Metzora were read together as a double portion, so there are only two posts on Metzor (and two on Tazria).

Something to Notice — How “natural” or ordinary was menstruation in the ancient world?

Great Source — L. Hoffman on original, gender neutral purity rules

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Pool of a medieval mikveh in Speyer, dating back to 1128 (Chris 73, Wikicommons)