Lament for Mismatched Glassware

Exploring Babylon Chapter 16.1 At several points in the Megillah reading, the chant for the Book of Esther shifts to the Lamentations chant. The lament behind some verses seems clear: Mordecai’s introduction as a descendant of Babylonian exiles (2:6) and the decree telling all provinces to destroy the Jews (3:15), for example. It’s less obvious […]

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The Babylon Road

The biblical Rachel’s life and death link her to the Babylon of the past and future and to the precarious nature of Israel’s future on the land.

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Babylon and the Writing on the Wall

Rome’s satirical translation of the “writing on the wall” seems as appropriate to 2017 as to 1939, and it’s quite faithful to the biblical text… This song also leads to further questions about how we understand and interact with sacred text, particularly at times of crisis.

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Babylon: Assimilation and Separation

Reading the story of Gerar as a morality tale about the dangers of “religious prejudices,” helps make sense of an otherwise disturbing and puzzling text. It seems a powerful lesson any generation could use. Whether Jews in Babylonian Captivity actually gleaned…

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Babylon: Back Home

Updated with additional Moon-cult link and previously missing footnotes. Exploring Babylon: Chapter 3:2 The Torah doesn’t tell us much about the background of Abraham and Sarah, except that they leave it. We learn later, though, that their family maintains ties with the folk “back home.” And that on-going relationship has a lot to do, both […]

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Babylon: Babel’s (Distant) Background

Exploring Babylon: Chapter 3.1 The Hebrew “Bavel” is translated into English as “Babel” in Genesis and as “Babylon” when it appears elsewhere in the Tanakh. Bavel as Babel shows up in a total of two verses in the entire Torah text: Gen 10:10, Nimrod’s legacy — “the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, […]

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